yield


yield
yield vb
1 produce, turn out, *bear
Analogous words: *generate, engender, breed, propagate: create, *invent: form, shape, *make, fabricate, fashion
2 *relinquish, surrender, cede, abandon, leave, resign, waive
Analogous words: *forgo, forbear, abnegate, eschew, sacrifice: *abdicate, renounce, resign
Contrasted words: *keep, keep back, retain, withhold: appropriate, *arrogate, confiscate
3 Yield, submit, capitulate, succumb, relent, defer, bow, cave can all mean to give way to someone or something that one cannot further resist.
Yield (see also RELINQUISH; BEAR 2), when the reference is to a person implies being overcome (as by force, argument, or entreaty) (yield to persuasion)
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yield to temptation

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he never yields except when the matter under discussion is of no significance to him

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the great principle in a contest with a child is: do not yield but do not punish— Russell

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but when the reference is to a thing, the word implies elasticity, or lack of firmness, strength, or endurance in the thing that gives way
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the door suddenly yielded to her hand— Austen

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the house they went to was ... a human burrow or habitation that had yielded at every point to the crotchets and meanderings of a growing family— Cheever

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Submit carries a more definite implication of contention or conflict than yield and, therefore, suggests more strongly a surrender after resistance to another's will, or because of a thing's strength or inevitableness
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all is not lost—the unconquerable will . . . and courage never to submitMilton

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the Indian summer of her heart, which was slow to submit to ageStevenson

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a long diatribe against Pitt for having tamely submitted to the rebuffs of the French Directory— Quiller-Couch

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submitted to their joking with the best grace she could— Wouk

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Capitulate can mean to surrender on terms definitely agreed upon, but in its common extended use, it more often centers attention on a definite submission to a force or power that one has not the strength, the skill, or the will to overcome
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I always tip for special services rendered but I will not capitulate before sheer impertinence— Wechsberg

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the universities would capitulate to a young, vigorous and revolutionary creed— Moberly

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Succumb carries a stronger implication than any of the preceding terms of weakness or helplessness in the person or thing that gives way or of strength or irresistibility in the person or more often the thing that causes the giving way. The suggestion of sinking under that force or power is usually so strong in succumb that the word frequently implies a disastrous outcome (as death, destruction, or subjugation) (succumb to pneumonia)
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the best of constitutions will not prevent ambitious politicians from succumbing . . . to the temptations of power— Huxley

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true passion . . . must be crushed before it will succumbMeredith

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All of the preceding terms usually imply a giving way on the part of a person or sometimes a thing that has not or cannot maintain the upper hand; they therefore often imply a weakening of the one that gives way.
Relent, by contrast, implies a yielding on the part of the one who has the upper hand and who has been severe or harsh in his attitude to another person or fixed in his determination (as to punish, to interfere, or to frustrate). The term therefore implies a softening or mollifying that turns him from his previous course
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can you hear a good man groan, and not relent?—Shak.

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when a second appeal, couched in more urgent terms, was dispatched to him, he relentedCerf

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Defer implies a yielding or submitting to because of respect or reverence for another or in recognition of another's authority or superior knowledge
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everybody must defer ... a nation must wait upon her decision, a dean and chapter truckle to her wishes— Sackville-West

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clearly conscious of her success and of the way these Londoners were deferring to her— Dahl

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Bow is a picturesque equivalent of defer or submit; it may suggest a yielding through courtesy or through subjugation (bow to the inevitable)
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bow to established authority

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he admired the tribal discipline which made May bow to this decision— Wharton

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Cave, usually with in, can be a close synonym of succumb, but it often suggests resistance to pressure to the point of exhaustion and sudden collapse
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in the end government caved in, and unconditionally agreed to inquiry— Punch

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Analogous words: surrender, cede, waive (see RELINQUISH): concede, accord, award, *grant

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • yield — 1 / yēld/ vt: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment: furnish as profit or interest an account that yield s 6 percent vi 1: to give place or precedence (as to one having a superior right or claim) 2: to relinquish the floor of a… …   Law dictionary

  • Yield — Yield, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Yielded}; obs. p. p. {Yold}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Yielding}.] [OE. yelden, [yogh]elden, [yogh]ilden, AS. gieldan, gildan, to pay, give, restore, make an offering; akin to OFries. jelda, OS. geldan, D. gelden to cost, to be …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Yield — Álbum de Pearl Jam Publicación 3 de febrero de 1998 Grabación de Febrero a Septiembre de 1997 en los estudios Litho y estudios Bad Animals Género(s) Rock Alternativo, Grung …   Wikipedia Español

  • yield´er — yield «yeeld», verb, noun. –v.t. 1. a) to produce; bear: »This land yields good crops. Mines yield ores. SYNONYM(S): furnish, supply. b) to give in return; bring in: »an investment which yielded a large profit. c) to fill a need; furnish; afford …   Useful english dictionary

  • Yield — bezeichnet: Ausbeute (Halbleitertechnik) Yield, der englische Begriff für Rendite All Risk Yield (Nettoanfangsrendite bei Immobilieninvestitionen) Yield Spread Analyse, der englische Begriff für die Portfolioanalyse Yield Compression, auch… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • yield — [yēld] vt. [ME yelden < OE gieldan, to pay, give, akin to Ger gelten, to be worth < IE base * ghel tō, (I) give, pay] 1. to produce; specif., a) to give or furnish as a natural process or as the result of cultivation [an orchard that… …   English World dictionary

  • Yield — Yield, v. i. 1. To give up the contest; to submit; to surrender; to succumb. [1913 Webster] He saw the fainting Grecians yield. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To comply with; to assent; as, I yielded to his request. [1913 Webster] 3. To give way; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yield — [n] production of labor crop, earnings, harvest, income, output, outturn, produce, profit, return, revenue, takings, turnout; concept 260 yield [v1] produce accrue, admit, afford, allow, beam, bear, blossom, bring forth, bring in, discharge, earn …   New thesaurus

  • Yield — Yield, n. Amount yielded; product; applied especially to products resulting from growth or cultivation. A goodly yield of fruit doth bring. Bacon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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